05/22/2017



Pomeranian

Narrator: Did you know that Michelangelo painted the Sistine Chapel with a Pomeranian at his side. Often call a palm, it’s one of only three canines to survive the sinking of the Titanic.

Zak George: The stereotypical Pomeranian is going to be small and yappy and excited and energetic and a great pet to their parents.

Andrea Arden: I think Pomeranians are definitely one of the cutest dogs out there. They’re hard to resist.

Narrator: Weighing an average four to six pounds these irresistible little dogs once weighed over seven times that weight.

Dr. Karen Halligan: Older Pomeranians were actually about 30 pounds and they were white.

Narrator: Yup, that’s really a Pomeranian.

Dr. Karen Halligan: And then they were bred down to the size you see today.

Narrator: The person responsible for downsizing this dog was England’s Queen Victoria. She loved Pomeranians. In the late 1800s she established her own kennel and began importing smaller palms of all colors and created her perfect lap dog.

Andrea Arden: The Pomeranian actually is a descendant of sled dogs from Iceland and Lapland.

Narrator: And believe it or not this little dog’s ancestors include these heavyweights – the Alaskan Malamute, the Samoyed, the Siberian Husky, and the Keeshond.

Dr. Cherise Clement: While the today’s Pomeranian certainly can’t pull a sled, it’s a miniaturized version of those dogs. They’re very vivacious and most people know them for their very cute little face and then this big huge puff ball of fur.

Narrator: One of the most identifiable characteristics of the Pomeranian is their abundant double coat. It’s made up of a long harsh textured outer coat that covers a soft dense undercoat. Their triangle shaped ears contribute to the foxy look of this breed.

Dr. Karen Halligan: They actually have tiny little straight up ears that sometimes can be difficult to see because of their plush coat.

Narrator: The tail is heavily feathered and is set high and lies flat on its back.

Andrea Arden: Underneath that very fluffy coat and very cute face these are very athletic dogs that excel at a lot of different dog sports including agility, fly ball and obedience.

Dr. Karen Halligan: This is truly a big dog personality in a little dog package. They are just lots of personality and they demand attention, they demand pampering.

Narrator: If you’re thinking of pampering a Pomeranian there are a few things to consider. These dogs are quite versatile and they can live just about anywhere, just don’t confuse their size with their energy level, they still need a daily walk. They’re also known to bark excessively so it’s important for owners to work on barking issues early on.

Andrea Arden: This is a dog who if you don’t focus its energy you’re going to be getting a lot of notes from your neighbors saying that your dog is keeping them awake at night.

Narrator: Pomeranians live 12 to 15 years and are prone to early tooth loss. Feeding them dry food is recommended. They also suffer from luxating patellas or slipping knee calves.

Dr. Karen Halligan: And that’s where the kneecap which sits in the middle of the femur which is your big large thigh bone rides in and out, it shifts and falls over. So you’ll see a lot of these dogs kind of skip and sometimes that needs to be corrected surgically.

Narrator: Palms are heavy and constant shedders so daily grooming is a must with this breed to avoid tangling and matting.

Joey Villani: Check the ears make sure the nails are trimmed back, and make sure to go see your professional groomer every four to six weeks.

Narrator: Pomeranians are very happy-go-lucky dogs that crave human companionship.

Joey Villani: This is a great lap dog, this is a great dog that’s going to sit next to you on the couch and it wants to be stroked and petted the whole time.

Narrator: They’re great dogs for just about anyone. However they’re not recommended for families with young children because of their fragile frame.

Andrea Arden: You don’t want a child picking up a Pomeranian and accidentally dropping it on the floor.

Narrator: Training should start early and be consistent.

Dr. Cherise Clement: They are very intelligent but they are headstrong. And so they’re not the easiest dogs to train.

Narrator: So in general Pomeranians can live anywhere as long as they get exercise, they’re prone to tooth loss and luxating patellas, and need regular grooming. And if they’re trained early on they can make great family dogs.

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